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national parks
Norway´s National Parks are regulated by the laws of nature. Nature decides both how and when to do things. National Parks are established in order to protect large natural areas - from the coast to the mountains. This is done for our sake, for generations to come and for the benefit of nature itself.

Norway´s 35 National Parks, 28 on the mainland and 7 on Svalbard, offer a wide range of opportunities and experiences. The natural surroundings are beautiful and varied. There is mountains, cycling, diving, glaciers, hiking, cycling, midnight sun, northern lights, rafting, riding, conoing, safari, sailing, skiing, swimming, hunting, fishing, plants, birds, animals and cultural monuments.







BØRGEFJELL NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1.447 km2. Established in 1963 and Extended in 1971, 2003. Mountain wilderness with many lakes and rivers in the County of Nordland and Nord-Trøndelag.

Most of Børgefjell National Park is a wilderness, affecting our senses with a wide range of powerful impressions. In the west there are high summits and deep valleys with cirque glaciers and mountain lakes. In the south there are wild river rapids and beautiful waterfalls, while the eastern parts are characterised by more rounded hill tops and open heath land. For those interested in hunting and trout fishing, Børgefjell has much to offer. Børgefjell is also one of the few places you can encounter the Arctic fox, the most endangered mammal in Norway.




HALLINGSKARVET NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 450 km2. Established in 2006. Mountain wilderness with many lakes and rivers in the Counties of Buskerud, Hordaland and Sogn & Fjordane.

Hallingskarvet National Park is a national park in the municipalities Hol, Ulvik and Aurland.

The national park covers 450 km2 in the mountain range Hallingskarvet, and hosts large stocks of reindeer, important for the establishment of the park. The highest point in the national park is Folarskardnuten, of elevation 1,933 metres.




BLÅFJELLA-SKJÆKERFJELLA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1.924 km2. Established in 1970 extended in 2004. Mountain wilderness with many lakes and rivers in the Counties of Nord-Trøndelag.

Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella is the new name of the national park used to be Gressåmoen national park. The only road to the park is running through Gressåmoen Farm. The landscape is full of contrasts and can offer still woodlands and smooth rock faces, and also jagged cliffs, thundering waterfalls, glaciers and snowfields. The bedrock here provides a basis for luxuriant vegetation and a rich plant and animal life. Marshland is the most important characteristic in this part of the landscape. Its numerous rivers and lakes make the park an eldorado for trout fishing. Hunting is permitted in the national park, although elk hunting is prohibited in the core area.




DOVRE NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 289 km2. Established in 2003. Mountain wilderness with many lakes and rivers at the Counties of Hedmark and Oppland.

The nature is diverse and interesting. The west is dominated by more barren types of rock, while the east has calcium-rich soil that supports a flourishing and varied plant life. The area just east of the National Park is home to the famous Knutshøene hills. The spray and roar of the thundering waterfalls are an impressive reminder of the strength of primal forces unchecked. The nature found in Dovre National Park and the neighbouring conservation areas are one of Norway´s national treasures.




DOVREFJELL - SUNNDALSFJELLA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,447 km2. Established in 2002 (Replaced Dovrefjell national park, established in 1974). Mountain wilderness with many lakes and rivers at the Counties of Møre & Romsdal Sør-Trøndelag and Oppland.

A national symbol with a unique mountain flora in central Norway. In 1814, the members of the first Norwegian parliament swore in Eidsvoll that they would remain "United and faithful until the Mountains of Dovre should crumble", effectively making Dovrefjell Norway´s national mountain range. For over 200 years, amateur and professional botanists having been coming here from around the world to study and enjoy the unique, rich mountain flora. The area also boasts a practically intact mountain fauna with wild reindeer, wolverine, Arctic fox and golden eagles. The herds of musk ox are also unique to Dovrefjell.




REINHEIMEN NATIONAL PARK

The park consists of a 1,969-square-kilometre continuous protected mountain area. Reinheimen National Park was established in 2006. It is located in Møre & Romsdal and Oppland counties in Western Norway. The park includes parts of the municipalities of Lesja, Skjåk, Vågå, Lom, Norddal, and Rauma.

The park consists of much of the Tafjordfjella mountain range as well as the reindeer habitat in the northern part of the Ottadalen valley. The park is one of the largest wilderness areas still intact in Southern Norway. Much of the original alpine ecosystem, including wild reindeer, wolverines, golden eagles, gyr falcons, and ptarmigans, is still intact. The park is made up of numerous mountains and valleys. The highest mountains in the park tower more than 2,000 metres above sea level. The landscape in Reinheimen is extremely varied. In the west, it is very dramatic, with sharply pointed peaks and knife-edge ridges, and rapidly flowing rivers.

Towards the east, the terrain is more gently sloping, plateaus occur, valleys are broader and rivers flow more slowly. A number of rivers, such as the Istra, Rauma, Lora, Finna/Skjerva, Valldøla, and Tora/Føysa, have their sources sources in Reinheimen.




FEMUNDSMARKA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 573 km2. Established in 1971 and extended in 2003. Glacial landscape with ancient spruce and glittering water on the border to Sweden, south east of Røros, at the Counties of Hedmark and Sør-Trøndelag.

With twisted pines and forgotten lakes scattered amongst a sea of boulders, Femundsmarka national park beckons you to experience it. Ten thousand years ago the glaciers receded, leaving behind a desolate, ice-age landscape - a landscape that has scarcely changed since. Here you can paddle a canoe for days through the many waterways and lakes. You can take a fishing rod with you, to catch the large trout that can be found here, and if you keep your eyes open to the beautiful natural landscape, you will be rewarded with a memorable excursion.

Together with adjoining protected areas in Sweden, Femundsmarka national park forms part of one of the largest continuous, untouched wilderness areas in southern Scandinavia. It is also an area that provides a habitat for a number of rare and vulnerable animal species.




FOLGEFONNA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 545,2 km2. Established in 2005.

Folgefonna National Park lies in the fjord and the mountainregion in the County of Hordaland between the Hardangerfjord, Åkrafjord and Sørfjord in different muncipalities. (Etne, Kvinnherad, Jondal, Ullensvang and Odda).

Folgefonna National Park is the first national park that goes from fjord to glacier, and is the 5 largest National Park south of Dovre. South Folgefonna is the third biggest glacier in the contry and is one of few wild landscape left in Hordaland. The 4 areas in the National Park Ænesdalen, Bondhusdalen, Hattebergsdalen and Buer have a special beautiful nature. The glacial rivers Eitrheim and Tokheim close to Odda, and Fonnavatna that runs out in Guddalsvassdraget, is now protected.

Map of Folgefonna glacier seen from Etne.




FOROLLHOGNA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,062 km2. Established in 2001. The terrain is easy to access, and makes for wonderful hiking experiences for both young and old. The Pilgrim trail to Trondheim cuts through the National Park.

Forollhogna is often associated with impressive antlers and large reindeer. The reindeer bucks here are larger than no other place in Norway. That says something about how rich and viable this mountain region is for all other life. In the open and virtually unspoilt landscape, on the border between Hedmark and Sør-Trøndelag counties, you´ll find a rich variety of plants and animals. In the neighbouring valleys traditional mountain farming is thriving.




GUTULIA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 23 km2. Established in 1968 and extended in 2004. Gutulia National Park is located at the County of Hedmark.

Gutulia National Park is the second smallest National Park in Norway. It is located south of Femundsmarka. Spruce, pine and birch wreath the high ridge of Gutulivola. For generations the forest has grown wild with almost no human intervention. Some pines are 400 years old, there is a virgin spruce forest, and there are small lakes and bogs - all in all an eldorado for small birds and waders. Easterly plants like ghost orchid, arctic bramble and sceptered lousewort grow here, and eastern fish such as grayling, vendace, perch, pike and burbot swim in the lakes and rivers.




HARDANGERVIDDA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 3,422 km2. Established in 1981. Northern Europe´s largest mountain plateau is located at the Counties of Buskerud and Hordaland and Telemark.

Hardangervidda is a mountain region of very high value, including Norway´s largest National Park. The National Park is home to the largest wild reindeer herds in Europe, and also the southernmost outpost of many arctic plants and animals, such as the Arctic fox and Snowy owl. The mountain plateau with a thousand lakes is an eldorado for hikers with tents and fishing rods.

Hardangervidda is an eldorado for hikers with tents and fishing rods. The area is famous for its numerous lakes and streams with excellent mountain trout. Marked trails are abundant, and you can get accommodation in one of the many tourist cabins, staffed, unstaffed or self-service. You can also hunt in the National Park. Be sure to get hunting and fishing licences.




JOSTEDALSBREEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,310 km2. Established in 1991. The largest ice-sheet in mainland Europe and located in the County of Sogn & Fjordane.

Jostedalsbreen National Park has an enormous variety of natural environments ranging from deciduous forest on the lower land to glaciers and bare mountains. The ice-sheet stretches for 60 km, covering almost half the park. The glaciers, glacial rivers and moraines, plus the cultural landscape of the mountain summer pastures represent important preservation values.

The old routes in the valleys around the glacier, such as Oldeskardet and Supphelleskardet, offer exciting walking tours. The valley glaciers of Briksdalsbreen glacier, Fjærland and Nigardsbreen glacier are well-known and paths lead right to the glacier in many places, including Kjenndalen and Austerdalen.

Map of Jostedalsbreen glacier seen from Stryn.

Map of Nigardsbreen glacier seen from Luster.

Map of Briksdalsbreen glacier seen from Stryn.





JOTUNHEIMEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,151 km2. Established in 1980 and located at the Counties of Oppland and Sogn & Fjordane.

Named by poet poet Aasmund Olavsson Vinje and travelled by Ibsen´s "Peer Gynt". The wild landscape with northern Europe´s highest peaks, has inspired Norwegians for thousands of years. From the first stone age settlers to today´s modern hikers.

Hunters and fishermen have used Jotunheimen for thousands of years, and since the 1850s Jotunheimen has been one of Norway´s most popular mountain walking areas. Some areas have a lot of tourist cabins and marked trails, while others are virtually untouched. There is good trout fishing in several lakes and streams, and fish breeding supplements natural spawning.




BORRE NATIONAL PARK

Borre mound cemetery forms part of the Borre National Park in Horten. The park covers 182,000 m2 and its collection of burial mounds is exceptional in Scandinavia. Today, seven large mounds and one cairn can be seen. At least two mounds and one cairn have been destroyed in modern times. There are also 25 smaller cairns and the cemetery may have been larger. Some of the monuments are over 45 meters in diameter and up to 6 meters high. Borrehaugene provides important historical knowledge and can be seen as evidence that there was a local power center from the Merovingian period to the Viking age.

The first investigations of the cemetery took place in 1852. Local road-builders used one of the mounds as a gravel-pit and in the process destroyed large parts of a richly equipped grave in a Viking ship. Antiquarian Nicolay Nicolaysen examined what was left of the mound. The grave contained weapons and riding equipment suggesting it was a man´s grave. The excavations uncovered an unusually good selection of craft work, much of which is on display at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo.

This artistic craft work has become known as the Borre style and is today known for its beautiful animal and knot ornaments, which were often used for decorating harnesses. Some of the smaller cairns were investigated in 1925. They turned out to be simple cremation graves. New excavations were undertaken during 1989 to 1991, both in and around the national park.




YTRE HVALER NATIONAL PARK

Ytre Hvaler National Park is a national park in Hvaler and Fredrikstad. It is mostly a marine park, covering the outer parts of the skerries of the Oslofjord´s east shore. To the south, the national park´s border lies on the Norway - Sweden border next to Kosterhavet National Park. Ytre Hvaler covers an area of 354 km2, of which 340 km2 is sea and 14 km2 is land. The park was established on 26 June 2009 and is the only marine national park in the country.

Settlements in the area may have been as old as the Bronze Age. The park is dominated by the coastal culture which has used the area for centuries, resulting in it including boathouses for fishing. Akerøya was settled between 1682 and 1807. There are more than 50 shipwrecks in the park, the most prominent being the frigate Lossen. Within the park are two lighthouses: Torbjørnskjær and Homlungen, both which are operated by the Norwegian Coastal Administration. The islands remain in use for grazing. The park includes the largest known coral reef in sheltered waters in Europe, which is located near the island Tisler.




JUNKERDAL NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 682 km2. Established in 2004 and located at the County of Nordland.

The landscape in Junkerdal National Park provides an environment for an extremely diverse flora with a great many rare plants. The entire area is important for understanding the migration and distribution of plants and animals following the last ice age.

The national park´s boundaries contain some of the best fishing spots in the Saltdal area, where you can hook both char and trout. Small game and moose hunting is also popular, but don´t forget your hunting and fishing licence!

Sami culture and tradition has left behind a wealth of traces and stories linked to the region. In old Sami culture, plants, animals and places all possessed souls and had considerable significance for day-to-day life.




LIERNE NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 333 km2. Established in 2004 and located at the County of Nord-Trøndelag.

Gentle lines, lower heights and broad valleys with fertile mountain sides are typical of the hospitable and smooth terrain in other parts of the national park. The bedrock here provides a basis for luxuriant vegetation and a rich plant and animal life. Marshland is the most important characteristic in this part of the landscape.

It´s numerous rivers and lakes make Lierne an eldorado for trout fishing. Hunting is permitted in the national park, although elk hunting is prohibited in the core area. You may move around freely in the national park, apart from one area east of the Namsvatn Lake.




MØYSALEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 51,2 km2. Established in 2003 and located at the County of Nordland.

The landscape of the Lofoten and Vesterålen region is magnificent and full of contrasts. It represents nature types and landscapes that to some extent haven´t been protected until now. Møysalen National Park is Norway´s third smallest and the Møysalen peak at 1,262 meters is the centerpiece of the magnificent and varied nature of the area.

The landscape is magnificent and full of contrasts with unique mountain formations, rich deciduous forest, old farmland and open fjords, unique in Norway. It represents nature types and landscapes that to some extent haven´t been protected until now.

The eastern shore of the fjord Øksfjorden is significantly different from the rest of the area, with its soft, rolling landscape. In the north is the Trovangen waterfall. With one of the regions tallest freefalls, it makes a magnificent impression.




ORMTJERNKAMPEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 9 km2. Established in 1968 and located at the County of Oppland.

Ormtjernkampen is the smallest of Norway´s National Parks. It is a natural ancient forest, where flora and fauna are allowed to grow wild, showing how the pine forest of southeast Norway was before the woodman´s axe made its mark.

Some parts of this area also have a rich understorey vegetation with plants, like the Lily-of-the-valley, whorled Solomons-seal, Field gentian and the rare Campanula barbata. The park has an alpine climate with cool summers and cold winters, and combined with a moderate annual precipitation this gives a high atmospheric humidity.




RAGO NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 171 km2. Established in 1971 and located at the County of Nordland.

Rago National Park has a magnificent rugged landscape, and is known for its steep mountains and cascading rivers. A scatter of pine trees grows among treeless upland heaths and smooth rock slabs dotted with erratic boulders. The flora is rather poor but includes some rare mountain plants. Wolverine breed here, while the lynx visits occasionally.

Splendid scenery awaits hikers visiting Rago. The natural approach route for a visitor to Rago is along Storskogdalen. You´ll find several marked trails and 2 unstaffed tourist cabins. However, the capacity is limited, so a tent is advisable, to be on the safe side. There are good fish stocks in several lakes in the National Park, and small game hunting is possible. Remember to get fishing and hunting licences.




REISA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 803 km2. Established in 1986 and located at the County of Troms.

For thousands of years the Reisa river has cut the long canyon which forms the focus of Reisa National Park. Narrow valleys and ravines, mighty waterfalls, river gorges and potholes dominate the park, which was established to protect a practically undisturbed area. The flora and fauna include more species than most of Northern Norway in total.

The most common way to get to the National Park is by riverboat from Bilto / Saraelv. Once inside the park there are several opportunities for hiking, with some unstaffes tourist cabins, and marked trails that are part of the "Nordkalottruta" trail. You can catch salmon, sea trout and sea char in the lower part of the valley, and perch, burbot, pike and powan higher up. There´s also pike in the Raisjavri lake. Hunting is possible in the area. Remember fishing and hunting licenses.




RONDANE NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 963 km2. Established in 1962 extended in 2003 and located at the Counties of Hedmark and Oppland.

Rondane National Park was Norway´s first National Park. It is particularly important as the home of one of our country´s last herds of wild reindeer, and covers a varied mountain landscape of high peaks, lichencovered plateaus and lush valleys. The park is dominated by the high peaks, narrow ravines and deep valleys of the Rondane massif. The poor bedrock supports only a sparse vegetation of mainly lichen and heather. Numerous traces of an early hunting culture can be seen.

Today´s visitors in Rondane are mainly fell-walkers or hikers. Rondane National Park is a popular area, due to dry climate and firm terrain, even if boulders and scree make the access difficult at times. There´s a network of marked trails and several tourist cabins. You can fish and hunt for hare, grouse and wild reindeer. Remember to get your fishing and hunting licenses.

Map of Rondane seen from Dovre.




SALTFJELLET - SVARTISEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,850 km2. Established in 1989 and located at the County of Nordland.

Saltfjellet-Svartisen is the most varied of Norway´s national parks, stretching from the green but wild Nordfjord in the west, over high mountains and eternal ice to fertile valleys and mountain birch with still rivers, and in the east the open fells of Saltfjellet with their great glacial sediments.

Svartisen glacier is the largest ice-sheet in northern Scandinavia, covering 370 km2. The limestone bedrock supports a rich flora with many rare species. The traditional reindeer herding areas include an outstanding collection of Sami monuments.

Map of Svartisen glacier seen from Rana.




SKARVAN and ROLTDALEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 441,4 km2. Established in 2004 and located at the Counties of Nord-Trøndelag and Sør-Trøndelag.

Skarvan og Roltdalen National Park represents a virtually untouched area of mountain and forest, typical for the region. It is one of the largest areas in Trøndelag that is not affected by major infrastructure development, and contains several interesting cultural monuments, especially connected to millstone production.

Schultzhytta, the only staffed tourist cabin in the area, has a central position in the National Park. The area is much used for hunting and fishing, due to large populations of small game and good fishing in the lakes. You can also participate in organised riding trips in the area.




ØVRE DIVIDAL NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 750 km2. Established in 1971 and located at the County of Troms.

In the wild border country of eastern Troms close to the Swedish border, a great variety of wildlife flourish in one of the richest areas of wilderness in the north. It´s a typical northern inland landscape with a mixture of pine and birch forests, high mountains, bogs and lakes.

The park has a rich mountain flora, with Square-stemmed Heather and Arctic Rhododendron growing abundantly. Some of Norway´s largest predators live in the national park and it´s above all the kingdom of the wolverine. This tireless hunter is found in denser numbers here than anywhere else in Europe.




ÅNDERDALEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 125 km2. Established in 1970 extended in 2004 and located at the County of Troms.

Ånderdalen National Park on the island of Senja is a characteristic coastal landscape in Troms. The surrounding mountains influence much of the Ånderdalen valley; barren mountains with heaths and scattered birches on their lower slopes. Between the mountains there are several lakes and broad rivers with raging rapids and waterfalls.

At first sight, the pine woodland seems to be on the verge of dying, but when taking a closer look one can also see a scattering of younger and healthier trees. Some of the trees, however, are nearly 500 years old. The vegetation contains few species, but includes some rare orchids. Elks thrive in Ånderdalen, and in some reaches of the rivers there are salmon, sea trout and sea char. An extension of the National Park westwards is in planning.




STABBURSDALEN NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 747 km2. Established in 1970 extended in 2002 and located at the County of Finnmark.

The northernmost pine forest in the world is in the Stabbursdalen valley, which also forms the northern limit for several species of animals and birds. Stabbursdalen National Park contains many of Finnmark´s typical landscape forms. The mountain range Gaissene, towers over the otherwise calm landscape, and the Stabburselva river is known for its excellent salmon fishing.

Now that the lower two waterfalls on the Stabbur river are bypassed by fish ladders, salmon can swim up to Njakkafossen waterfall. Fishing is so popular that care must be taken to limit the wear and tear on the countryside.




VARANGERHALVØYA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1.804 km2. Established in in 2006 and located at the County of Finnmark.

The National Park have a artic landscape and lies east in the county of Finnmark on a pennisuela in the municipalities of Båtsfjord, Nesseby, Vadsø and Vardø.

The area gave the name to the Varangian glaciation episode. A large part of this peninsula, including the town Vardø located on an island just east of the mainland, has an arctic tundra climate. However, on the south coast, including the town Vadsø, there is sufficient summer heat for birch trees to grow.

The landscape is formed before the Ice Age, when the entire country was covered by ice. The ice have marked the landscape whith a quite unique landscape forms. The flora and fauna have species from the Arctic and East Sibir (Russia).

Sami culture and tradition has left behind a wealth of traces and stories linked to the region. In old Sami culture, plants, animals and places all possessed souls and had considerable significance for day-to-day life.




ØVRE ANARJOHKA NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 1,390 km2. Established in 1975 and located at the County of Finnmark.

The national park is a remote and wild part of the Finnmarksvidda mountain plateau with a representative selection of natural environments. This remote area is characterised by an ancient rolling landscape with birch forest, sparse pine, extensive bogs and numerous lakes. Numerous species can be seen at Øvre Anarjohka. The palsa bogs with their core of everlasting ice are a characteristic feature, as is Labrador-tea which gives off a powerful scent on still and warm sunny days. Here, whooper swans and waders can remain undisturbed by people, if not by mosquitos.




ØVRE PASVIK NATIONAL PARK

The Park is approximately 119 km2. Established in 2003 and located at the County of Finnmark.

Long and open pinewood draping low and gently sloping ridges, glittering lakes and wide bogs - a landscape unchanged since the dawn of time, where the nature´s own rhythm has ruled. The pine forest on the Finnish and Russian borders is one of the largest virgin forests in Norway, a lobe extending from the Siberian taiga.

When going hiking in the National Park, it´s a good tip to follow the rivers, streams and lakes, so as not to lose your direction. The fishing is excellent, and you can catch for instance trout, grayling, burbot, pike and perch. Remember your fishing license.




SEILAND NATIONAL PARK

The Park is 316,3 km2 km2. Established in 2005 and located at the County of Finnmark.

Seiland is Finnmarks biggest island. The island is one of the Alpine coastline and have several mountains over 800 meters. The northenmost two glaciers Seilandsjøkelen and Nordmannsøkelen lies at Seiland. Long and open pinewood draping low and gently sloping ridges, glittering lakes and wide bogs - a landscape unchanged since the dawn of time, where the nature´s own rhythm has ruled.

When going hiking in the National Park, it´s a good tip to follow the rivers, streams and lakes, so as not to lose your direction. The fishing is excellent, and you can catch for instance trout, grayling, burbot, pike and perch. Remember your fishing license.




FÆRDER NATIONAL PARK

Færder National Park covers an area of 340 km2, 325 km of which are seabed. Established in 2013 and located at the County of Vestfold between Tønsberg, Nøtterøy and Tjøme. Ytre Hvaler National Park, which borders up to Kosterhavet National Park in Sweden, is due east of Færder.

Færder National Park is one of the richest wildlife habitats in Norway and has many traces left by people in bygone days. The area is also much used by holidaymakers and people seeking outdoor recreation. The magnificent scenery, shaped over millions of years by volcanic activity, ice ages and land uplift, and in the past three or four thousand years, by a wide variety of human activity, is almost unique on a global level.




On SVALBARD, nearly 60% of the islands are protected areas. The arctic nature is vulnerable towards human activities. Tourism is restricted. There are six national parks:

Forlandet (640 km2) Long, thin island with a mild arctic climate due to the Gulf Stream. Important nesting place for water birds.

North West Spitsbergen (3.560 km2) Wild reindeer, walrus and large colonies of sea birds are found here as well as areas of cultural interest.

South Spitsbergen (5.300 km2) Arctic landscape with large colonies of sea birds. More than half of the park area consist of permanent snow and ice.

Indre Wijdefjorden, Nordenskiold Land, Nordre Isfjorden, Sassen-Bunsow Land.




 

NATIONAL PARKS



OPPLAND


Dovre

Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella

Jotunheimen

Ormtjernkampen

Rondane

Reinheimen




HEDMARK


Dovre

Femundsmarka

Forollhogna

Gutulia

Rondane




BUSKERUD


Hardangervidda

Hallingskarvet




VESTFOLD


Borre National Park



ØSTFOLD


Ytre Hvaler National Park



TELEMARK


Hardangervidda



HORDALAND


Hardangervidda

Folgefonna

Hallingskarvet



SOGN & FJORDANE


Jostedalsbreen

Jotunheimen

Hallingskarvet




MØRE & ROMSDAL


Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella

Reinheimen



SØR TRØNDELAG


Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella

Femundsmarka

Forollhogna

Skarvan and Roltdalen




NORD TRØNDELAG


Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella

Børgefjell

Lierne

Skarvan and Roltdalen




NORDLAND


Børgefjell

Junkerdal

Møysalen

Rago

Saltfjellet - Svartisen


Lomsdal - Visten



TROMS


Reisa

Øvre Dividal

Ånderdalen




FINNMARK


Stabbursdalen

Øvre Anarjohka

Øvre Pasvik

Seiland

Varangerhalvøya




SVALBARD


Forlandet

Indre Wijdefjorden

Nordenskiøld Land

Nordre Isfjorden

Nordvest-Spitsbergen

Sassen-Bunsow Land

Sør-Spitsbergen